Today's teens spend a lot of time texting and posting to potential love interests on social media.For some, that can make dating easier because they may get to know one another better online first.

While it's not healthy to get wrapped up in your teen's dating life, there will be times when you may have to intervene.

If you overhear your teen saying mean comments or using manipulative tactics, speak up.

Make sure your teen knows that just because he's ready to go on a date, doesn't necessarily mean he's ready for a relationship.

Your parenting values, your teen's maturity level, and the specific situation will help you decide how much chaperoning your teen needs.

For those teens who tend to be shy, meeting in person can be much more difficult. Be open with your teen about everything from treating someone else with respect to your values about sexual activity.

Discuss potential problems teens may face when entering the dating scene, like the pressure to become sexually active or the pressure to get involved in a serious relationship.My budding romance depended on whether I heard the shrill ring of an old-fashioned land-line phone. The social lives of today’s teens don’t revolve around waiting for their phones to ring.Teens are much more likely to connect with each other through some form of social media, whether it’s Twitter, Instagram or matchmaking apps such as Tinder and Hot Or Not.One couple she knows chatted constantly on Facebook for more than two months—even though they saw each other every day at school—before the boy got up the nerve to ask out the girl.Connecting online is appealing, kids say, because it’s easier to present yourself in a different light than if you were meeting someone in person.She says that teens she knows often meet online by contacting each other through Facebook and by commenting on each other’s Twitter feeds and Instagram photos. If that person “likes” you back, it’s time for a digital chat.